Wednesday, April 22, 2020

April 23, 2020 T is for Turkey!

2020 A to Z Challenge!
T is for Wild Turkey!

Photo by Kathe Worsley
March 28, 2018
Most North American kids learn turkey identification early, by tracing outlines of their hands to make Thanksgiving cards. These big, spectacular birds are an increasingly common sight the rest of the year, too, as flocks stride around woods and clearings like miniature dinosaurs. Courting males puff themselves into feathery balls and fill the air with exuberant gobbling. The Wild Turkey’s popularity at the table led to a drastic decline in numbers, but they have recovered and now occur in every state except Alaska.

Photo by Kathe Worsley
March 28, 2018
To find Wild Turkeys it helps to get up early in the morning, when flocks of these large birds are often out foraging in clearings, field edges, and roadsides. Keep an eye out as you drive along forest edges, particularly forests with nut-bearing trees such as oak and hickory, and you may even see turkeys from your car. In spring and summer, listen for gobbling males; the calls are loud, distinctive, and they carry great distances. You’ll usually find turkeys on the ground, but don’t be surprised if you run across a group of turkeys flying high into their treetop roosts at the end of the day.

 Photo by Kathe Worsley
March 28, 2018

We lived for almost 7 years outside 
of Mt Shasta California. We lived on
10.5 acres on top of a hill with lots 
of California Black Oak trees,
amazing views of all the mountains,
not to forget all the wild animals
we were lucky to see.  I took all these
photos on this particular blog post 
plus this video I made in Spring of 2018.
Springtime is when the 
male Turkeys strut their stuff!
Enjoy! We sure did!



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18 comments:

  1. Wild turkeys are amazing animals, very unlike their domesticated brethren in some ways.

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    1. They are a lot more wily and have street smarts.

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  2. That was a fun video to watch. He didn't have much of an audience and didn't seem to make much of an impression on the hen. lol We have *many* turkeys around here. They often cross the street in groups. I don't think I've ever seen one puffed up though.

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    1. when they get puffed up and shake their feathers...the feathers make a rattling sound and then sometimes they stamp their feet and it almost looks like an American Indian dance.

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  3. When I was visiting friends in California, wild turkeys would come to the front yard early in the mornings. Sometimes they even flew up to the roof, and we had to chase them off with rattles. It was fun :D

    The Multicolored Diary

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    1. oh that is hysterical! I can just see that!

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  4. His love parade is so beautiful, and funny too. We don't have Wild Turkeys here, our forests are mainly full of wild boars and deers!
    T is for Taupe

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    1. oh that's right- I remember being in the Loire Valley at a B and B and she made a Wild Boar dinner that was unbelievably delicious! I think it was the Loire area.
      We always have so much fun in France.

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  5. They are pretty cool and it's nice to see them taking time off from whiskey making!

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    1. oh hahahah wild turkey bourbon.....took me a
      minute!

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  6. As they say, turkeys are not just for Christmas! These wild turkey's are simply spectacular.


    T is for ...

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    1. aren't they just something! We sometimes would have FORTY of them circling the house! We would go outside and "gobble gobble" and they would come running to us since we threw out cracked corn for them. I miss all the animals.

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  7. That is a bird I am familiar with! They show up on my street now and again.

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  8. I have heard they can be some pretty fierce creatures too!

    T is for Test Results
    https://thedreamgirlwrites.wordpress.com/2020/04/23/test-results/

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    1. they can indeed,but not towards us...just the competition! Good to hear from ya- enjoying your mystery story!

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  9. We have lots of these around here too. I enjoy watching them. One male attacks my hubbies truck bumper.

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  10. We have lots of turkeys and I enjoy watching them. They always look so improbably when they fly up into the trees. But they can definitely be aggressive and dangerous to people. I've never had a problem, but I did have one attack my car once - he saw his reflection and thought it was a rival.
    Black and White (Words and Pictures)

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